2018-03-29 / Education

Houghton Lake students learning job skills at CTE

By Cheryl Holladay


PRACTICING JOB SKILLS HLHS senior Landon VanPamel works on a T-joint in the Metal Fabrication/Welding class. He is looking forward to working as a welder after graduation. PRACTICING JOB SKILLS HLHS senior Landon VanPamel works on a T-joint in the Metal Fabrication/Welding class. He is looking forward to working as a welder after graduation. Getting a snowblower in working order, welding and running drill presses and lathes – these are just some of the skills Houghton Lake High School students are learning this year in addition to their regular coursework.

Twenty HLHS students are investing their time in their futures through an agreement between Houghton Lake Community Schools and the Wexford- Missaukee Ca­reer and Technical Education (CTE), Ca­dillac.

Juniors and seniors have a choice of 13 programs: Agriscience/Natural Resources; Applied Construction Technology; Automotive Technology; Business Man­agement Administration; Computers Networking Elec­tronics Technology (CNET); Digital Media Production; Engineering Technology; Heavy Equipment Mechan­ics; Hospitality, Retailing and Entrepreneurship; Intro to Health Care/Health Science Careers; Metal Fabrica­tion Welding; Power Sports and Equipment; and Public Safety.


LEARNING BY DOING Houghton Lake High School Senior Dakota Barr works on a music video assignment in her Digital Media Production class at Wexford-Missaukee Ca­reer and Technical Education, Cadillac. Barr, who would like to be a music producer in the future, said, “ I love everything about this class.” (Photos by Cheryl Holladay) LEARNING BY DOING Houghton Lake High School Senior Dakota Barr works on a music video assignment in her Digital Media Production class at Wexford-Missaukee Ca­reer and Technical Education, Cadillac. Barr, who would like to be a music producer in the future, said, “ I love everything about this class.” (Photos by Cheryl Holladay) The Resorter visited the CTE March 20 and met with some of the Houghton Lake students who are currently enrolled in nine of the programs.

Senior Dakota Barr is taking the Digital Media Production class where she is learning to make music videos, changes to audio levels and using professional cameras.

“I love everything about this class,” she said.

The class is taught by Kammy Cook. Two assistants in the class work for Cadillac area television stations.


SKILL BUILDING Guided by a blueprint, Houghton Lake High School senior Tyler Barth makes a thread on a piece of alumi­num in the Engineering Technology class on the campus of Wexford-Missaukee Ca­reer and Technical Educa­tion, Cadillac. “It’s a great course to go into,” he said, because those types of jobs “pay well.” Twenty HLHS students attend nine of the CTE’s 13 programs. (Photos by Cheryl Holladay) SKILL BUILDING Guided by a blueprint, Houghton Lake High School senior Tyler Barth makes a thread on a piece of alumi­num in the Engineering Technology class on the campus of Wexford-Missaukee Ca­reer and Technical Educa­tion, Cadillac. “It’s a great course to go into,” he said, because those types of jobs “pay well.” Twenty HLHS students attend nine of the CTE’s 13 programs. (Photos by Cheryl Holladay) Barr, who would like to be a music producer in the future, said she is learning how to mix music and edit videos.

Students can check out cameras to take home, she said. One was an old VHS recorder, she said, “that you have to rewind.” The brand new cameras have auto fo­cus, she said, “and you can change the lighting.”

She is learning how to edit in 4K, which pertains to the quality of video, she said, but because it is new, “there’s not a lot of technology that accepts it right now.”


GETTING IT TO WORK HLHS junior Courtney McNaughton starts up a snowblower she fixed in the Power Sports and Equipment class. It had a broken throttle cable, she said. She would like her next projects to be a chainsaw and a dirt bike. GETTING IT TO WORK HLHS junior Courtney McNaughton starts up a snowblower she fixed in the Power Sports and Equipment class. It had a broken throttle cable, she said. She would like her next projects to be a chainsaw and a dirt bike. The students are allowed to go “scouting,” she said, to record things around the campus that are then up­loaded to a computer and edited. She is currently work­ing on a music video that is due once she comes back from spring break.

One of her recent projects was a stop-motion anima­tion assignment, for which she received an A, she said.

“I ace almost everything in this class,” she said.

She drew individual pictures that she made into a one and a half-minute movie.


LASTING LESSON One of the CTE programs is Applied Construction Technology. CTE Director Dave Cox said the goal in the program is to build a house every two years. Two Houghton Lake students (not pictured), Jeremy Bowler and Cameron Allport, are in the program. He said buyers like the homes because any student errors are corrected rather than covered up. LASTING LESSON One of the CTE programs is Applied Construction Technology. CTE Director Dave Cox said the goal in the program is to build a house every two years. Two Houghton Lake students (not pictured), Jeremy Bowler and Cameron Allport, are in the program. He said buyers like the homes because any student errors are corrected rather than covered up. “Tim Burton makes whole movies like that,” she said.

The stop-motion movie was a team project, she said, with fellow HLHS student Ariel Bachman.

Barr said there is a lot of teamwork in the class.

Digital Media Production is the only class that does not have some sort of industry-recognized certification connected to it.

“I’m in it for the experience,” she said.

Over in the Power Sports and Equipment room, ju­nior Courtney McNaughton said she was in the Auto­motive

Technology class last semester, but prefers small engines.

“I like this better,” she said. “I race dirt bikes and snowmobiles and ride horses. I actually like it.”

The class is 60% lecture, she said, and the students are assigned projects to do.

McNaughton said her most recent project was a snowblower that had a broken throttle cable.

“I fixed it today,” she said, adding that she also changed and tightened the spark plug.

She said she would like to work on a chainsaw and a dirt bike next.

“Mr. [David] Mackey is the main instructor,” she said, “and Mr. [Ken] Hambright is the parapro. They make sure you get it done and you under­stand.”

Projects can arrive via Habitat for Humanity (so they may be sold) or by word of mouth.

“It may take a month,” McNaugton said, of the repairs. “You may see problems and the first one wasn’t [really] the problem.”

She said she likes problem-solving, doing tests on the equipment and working in the tool room.

“You get to be active,” she said. “You’re not sitting in a chair.”

CTE Director Dave Cox added that NAPA also provides some automotive and diesel training.

Among the students in the nearby Metal Fabrication/Welding room was senior Landon VanPamel.

He was practicing welding a T-joint using copper-coated wire in a Gas Metal Arc Welding process that is sometimes referred to as MIG welding.

VanPamel said he has a job lined up in Florida when he graduates, work­ing on I-beams for bridges.

Instructor Troy Goloversic said students learn five welding processes, in­cluding Shielded Metal Arc Welding, and machinery, such as drill presses, band saws, circular saws and metal brakes used for bending metal.

Senior Tyler Barth is in his first year in the Engineering Technology pro­gram.

He said the instructor, Doug Chase, provides instruction, but then gives the students their “own responsibilities.” If they make a mistake, they have to restart their project, Barth said.

“Mr. Chase keeps a good eye on us,” he said.

In the class, students are given a process sheet and blueprints for projects, Barth said.

“It has to run and be able to be sent out and sold,” he said, of the work.

Barth said he likes the “freedom” of the class because he can dictate his own schedule.

“I also like the people,” he said, adding that he has met students from different schools.

The types of skills he is learning, he said, can lead to job offers that pay well.

“It’s a great course to go into,” he said.

The day of the Resorter’s visit (which was also a day the HLHS eighth graders visited), Barth was putting threads in a piece of aluminum.

“I cut the stock myself,” he said.

Barth said he is learning several pieces of equipment, from drill presses and lathes to programming a CNC ma­chine.

“It’s simple,” he said, “you just have to learn how to use the ma­chines.”

He said he would like to go into some type of engineering or grind­ing job.

Chase, a former professor at Fer­ris State University, said he teaches the students the fundamentals up front. He can tell if something is not going well, just by looking at the machine.

“I watch to see if they make mistakes,” he said. “I want them to make mistakes before they get out in the real world.”

Two students, Jeremy Bowler and Cameron Allport, are in the CTE’s Applied Construction Technology program.

The class is building a home near the campus in Cadillac.

Cox said the goal of the program is to build a house every two years. The previous home that the class built was sold; proceeds from each house go toward funding material for the next project.

An advisory committee provides input into the program, he said, and a building committee within the larger group sets up the project, ensuring the size and amenities are sellable in the Cadillac community.

Other HLHS students attending the CTE are in Automotive Tech­nology – Jordan Naylor, Jonathan Paxson, Patience-Jean Anderson and Codi Robinson; Business Man­agement Administration – Autumn Grahl; Digital Media Production – Latricia Eash, Nicklas Davison, Christopher Lake and Shawn Se­cord; Engineering Technology – Calvin Caster; Hospitality, Retail­ing and Entrepreneurship – Kendra Cross; Intro to Health Care – Re­becca Birch; and Power Sports and Equipment – Jason Davis.

There are also two students who attend from Roscommon High School: Applied Construction Tech­nology – James Bannon; and Agri­science and Natural Resources – Hailey Gavlinski.

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